The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online
The sale popular Silmarillion online__below

Description

Product Description

The tales of The Silmarillion were the underlying inspiration and source of J.R.R. Tolkien''s imaginative writing; he worked on the book throughout his life but never brought it to a final form. Long preceding in its origins The Lord of the Rings, it is the story of the First Age of Tolkien''s world, the ancient drama to which characters in The Lord of the RIngs look back and in which some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part.

The title Silmarillion is shortened from Quenta Silmarillion, "The History of the Silmarils," the three great jewels created by Feanor, most gifted of the Elves, in which he imprisoned the light of the Two Trees that illumined Valinor, the land of the gods. When Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, destroyed the Trees, that light lived on only in the Silmarils; Morgoth seized them and set them in his crown, guarded in the impenetrable fortress of Angband in the north of Middle-earth. The Silmarillion is the history of the rebellion of Feanor and his people against the gods, their exile in Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all the heroisim of Elves and Men, against the great Enemy.

The book includes several other, shorter works beside The Silmarillion proper. Preceding it are "Ainulindale," the myth of Creation, and "Valaquenta," in which the nature and powers of each of the gods is set forth. After The Silmarillion is "Akallabeth," the story of the downfall of the great island kingdom of Numenor at the end of the Second Age; completing the volume is "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age," in which the events of The Lord of the Rings are treated in the manner of The Silmarillion.

This new edition of The Silmarillion contains the revised and corrected "second edition" text and, by way of introduction, a letter written by J.R.R. Tolkien in 1951, which provides a brilliant exposition of his conception of the earlier Ages. It also contains almost fifty full-color illustrations by the artist Ted Nasmith, many of which appear for the first time.

Review

"A creation of singular beauty... magnificent in its best moments" The Washington Post

"A great and transcending romance of love and war and adventures." Los Angeles Times

"Heart-lifting... a work of power, eloquence, and noble vision.... Superb!" The Wall Street Journal

About the Author

J.R.R. TOLKIEN (1892–1973) is the creator of Middle-earth and author of such classic and extraordinary works of fiction as The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. His books have been translated into more than fifty languages and have sold many millions of copies worldwide.


A native of Goderich, Ontario, Ted Nasmith spent much of his young life on the move and lived for three years in France. He has illustrated several Tolkien calendars and Robert Foster''s Complete Guide to Middle-earth but is perhaps best known for his work on The Silmarillion


CHRISTOPHER TOLKIEN (1924–2020) was the third son of J.R.R. Tolkien. Appointed by Tolkien to be his literary executor, he devoted himself to the editing and publication of unpublished writings, notably The Silmarillion, Unfinished Tales, and The History of Middle-earth.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

More items to explore

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
9,867 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Leah
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five stars? Absolutely!
Reviewed in the United States on December 20, 2017
WARNING: SOME SPOILERS I first read Lord of the Rings when I was ten years old. Since then I''ve been a passionate fan, reading the books multiple times throughout the years. When I was eighteen, I tried to read the Silmarillion; it took a few tries, but I finally... See more
WARNING: SOME SPOILERS

I first read Lord of the Rings when I was ten years old. Since then I''ve been a passionate fan, reading the books multiple times throughout the years. When I was eighteen, I tried to read the Silmarillion; it took a few tries, but I finally got past the rather heavy, slow beginning and had reached the part where Morgoth and Ungoliant escape from Valinor with the Silmarils. Then I lost the book and couldn''t find it for a long time. By the time I did find it, I had forgotten a lot of what I''d read and couldn''t seem to get back into it. So I put it aside, and the book was lost during a move.
I did purchase The Children of Hurin, which I loved and have read several times.

But I finally read The Silmarillion last month and now I''m like, why in the WORLD did I wait so long? This book is seriously epic. Even the beginning, slow as it is, is pure poetic prose. The names are magic. And so much that I hardly noticed in LotR, because I didn''t understand it, makes sense now. Beren and Luthien: it''s so much more than just a love story (and there''s a heroic dog, too!). Earendil: I always had a hard time reading through Bilbo''s song about Earendil because it was so long and didn''t seem to make a lot of sense. Now that I know who he was and why he built the ship and journeyed through perilous waters, I love the poem and the story behind it.
And elves! By the time of LotR they are fading; you only get glimpses of who they really are or were. In The Silmarillion, they are full-on amazing. Tragic, stubborn, bull-headed, valiant, so many words to describe them. The human characters are awesome too. Hurin isn''t just Turin''s father; he is a mighty warrior in his own right, and faces Morgoth down and mocks him (with tragic consequences, unfortunately).
This stuff is epic in every sense of the word.
When I finished reading, I was reeling a bit from all the feelings it gave me. It was almost like experiencing Lord of the Rings for the first time, just this time I was older and able to appreciate it even more.
This is absolute poetry from someone who knew just the right way to make every word sound like music. It''s also an amazing epic from a man who had some kind of crazy busy imagination.

The Akallabeth is epic too, but it''s much more condensed and doesn''t have the same weighty feeling of ancient history (though it too takes place long before LotR). It''s valuable, though, because in it we learn about the Men of the West, where Elendil and Isildur came from, and also we see the first rise of Sauron after his own master''s defeat. The Akallabeth has basically no elves; this is a story of men, of the rise and then terrible fall of the Numenoreans. I can''t say that I enjoyed it as much as The Silmarillion; but of course it would be hard to top that!

In conclusion, I''m so glad that I read this at last; and though I sort of wish I''d read it sooner, the first-time experience of reading it was so amazing that I''m glad it was recent, as it still lingers in my mind. Go out and buy a copy of it, if you enjoyed Lord of the Rings. Persevere through those first chapters of set-up, and the payoff will be worth it. I promise.
287 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
BALACOBACO
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The definition of "masterpiece" itself!
Reviewed in the United States on January 28, 2015
Let''s begin... First, I''m not what people call a "Tolkien purist" or a "Tolkien fanatic" or whatever. I read "Lord Of The Rings" only once (liked it a lot), "The Hobbit" only once (liked it, but less than "Lord Of The Rings"), watched the movies, and, only now, I... See more
Let''s begin...

First, I''m not what people call a "Tolkien purist" or a "Tolkien fanatic" or whatever. I read "Lord Of The Rings" only once (liked it a lot), "The Hobbit" only once (liked it, but less than "Lord Of The Rings"), watched the movies, and, only now, I stared "The Silmarillion" in the eye!

And I loved it. With all my heart. The book is majestic, breathtaking, excting. Let me get to some points:

a. I completely understand those who not enjoy the writing style or the book itself, even thoso who KNOW that this is not a novel, but almost a history book of a fictional mythology.

b. There is violence. A lot. A lot of violence. It''s tragedy after tragedy after tragedy, after betrayal, etc. But there is no gore. There are no cheap George R.R. Martin moments here.

c. The Glossary is amazing. All one needs to do, in order to rembember all the names that appear in the book, is to consult the glossary at the end of the book.

d. I think one should understand the following, about the writer''s writing style: for Tolkien, EVERY WORD COUNTS. There''s no verborragia, no filler. He is set on a mission to tell a fable, and he does so with economy of word, but with deep impact.

The negative aspect of reading this book is that, day after day, I enjoy LESS the movies!
554 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Mark Holt
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A difficult read at times but ultimately rewarding
Reviewed in the United States on January 26, 2017
I have just completed my second reading of The Silmarillion and was, again, astounded by the breathtaking scope of what Tolkien set out to accomplish. This is nothing less than a history of Middle Earth, from the creation of the world, to the end of the second age. (For... See more
I have just completed my second reading of The Silmarillion and was, again, astounded by the breathtaking scope of what Tolkien set out to accomplish. This is nothing less than a history of Middle Earth, from the creation of the world, to the end of the second age. (For the few who may not know, the events of The. Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings take place during, and constitute the end of, the third age of Middle Earth.) It is an epic work that Tolkien labored on for most of his life and, indeed, had not completed at the time of his death. His son, Christopher, set out to assemble the most complete and cohesive versions of his father''s many drafts, and the result of those labors is this volume.

The lion''s share of this book, and the reason for it''s title, is the history of the Silmarils, jewels of surpassing beauty that capture the essence of the long lost light of the trees of Valinor, from before there was a sun and moon. The story of their creation, subsequent theft by the dark lord Morgoth, and the many acts of bravery, heroism, sacrifice and betrayal involved in the quest to recover them, form the most compelling narrative of the book. And, make no mistake, it is very compelling at times. It can also be confusing and overwhelming at times.

This is not an easy read. The sheer volume of character and place names the reader needs to keep track of is enough to turn many readers away. (In dealing with this, I found the Kindle version, with its easy access to x-ray and wikipedia references, invaluable.) The prose style can be off-putting as well, written, as it is, from on high. In a tale of this scope, there is little time for in depth character exploration and little thought of relatability. Though the tales are rich and fascinating, there is little danger that you will fall in love with any of the characters. It''s not that kind of book.

In short, this is not a book for the casual Lord of the Rings fan. For those wishing to delve deeper into the rich world of that story, however, this is essential reading.
138 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
ZadNostrom
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Tolkien''s Masterwork
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2018
Among all of the amazing works of literature that J.R.R. Tolkien wrote in his lifetime I would consider this to be his best, or at the very least the work he felt the most strongly about. He worked on it right up until he passed away, leaving the job of putting everything... See more
Among all of the amazing works of literature that J.R.R. Tolkien wrote in his lifetime I would consider this to be his best, or at the very least the work he felt the most strongly about. He worked on it right up until he passed away, leaving the job of putting everything in order to his son Christopher. The end result is a breathtaking work of fantasy. Back when the LOTR movies were coming out and my friends began to ask about this book I would describe it as ''It''s basically the Elvish Bible''. The book covers everything from the creation of Middle-Earth all the way to the events leading up to ''The Hobbit'' and ''The Lord of the Rings''. Since the events in the book predate ''The Hobbit'' and ''The Lord of the Rings'' one isn''t required to read them before this one. Reading this before them, however, imbues them with an added richness that strengthens all three of the books. I cannot recommend this book enough.
34 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Matthew Ries
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
For Tolkien Enthusiasts, Not General Readers
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2019
The creation of Middle-earth and its First Age is presented in both mythical and historical accounts that set the stage for The Lord of the Rings in the world’s Third Age. The Silmarillion is the posthumously published collection of J.R.R. Tolkien’s worldbuilding tales... See more
The creation of Middle-earth and its First Age is presented in both mythical and historical accounts that set the stage for The Lord of the Rings in the world’s Third Age. The Silmarillion is the posthumously published collection of J.R.R. Tolkien’s worldbuilding tales concerning the creation and history of Middle-earth focusing on the First Age but also delving into the relevant history leading to the War of the Ring.

Middle-earth was created through song by the Ainur, though one of their number—Melkor—attempts to disrupt the tune three times but it overpowered by Eru (God). Eru then showed the Ainur a vision of the world and offered them the chance to enter it and rule, many took up the offer including Melkor. While many of the Ainur, the more powerful Valar and lesser Maiar, attempted to create a world for the Elves and Man, Melkor repeatedly destroyed their work and seduced some of the Maiar to his side, including Sauron. The book then shifts into the Tale of the Simarils, which were three jewels crafted by the Elf Feanor that glowed with the light of the Two Trees that were the only source of light before the Moon and Sun were created by the last remnants after their destruction by Melkor who then killed Feanor’s father and stole of the Simarils. Feanor long duped and corrupted by Melkor’s lies leads the Nordor Elves out of the West to Middle-earth to regain the jewels and do terrible things while Feanor and his sons make a dark oath to recover the jewels. Over the next 500 years, the various Elven groups in Middle-earth battle the now entitled Morgoth and his minions while later to be joined by Men. But the curse of Feanor devastates the Nordor and all that become related to them or allied to them or that touch the Simarils. Eventually a Elf-Man, Earendil arrives in The West to beg for help against Morgoth and the Valar with those Elves that hadn’t join the Nordor attack Morgoth and overpower him but the Simarils are lost in Space, the Sea, and the Earth until the End of the World. The book then gives an overview of the Second Age and the time of Numenor, their glory and fall by the lies of Sauron who’s defeat by the Last Alliance ends the Age and disperses his power for a time. And finally, the book ends with the overview of the creation of the rings of power and the Ring by Sauron then an overview of the lead up to and through the War of the Ring as seen in The Lord of the Ring.

While Tolkien did have some wonderful worldbuilding ideas, the mix of mythical and historical tales were hit-and-miss with a lot of dryness poured on. While there is a somewhat narrative framework to the book, there is no narrative flow. Though some of this can be attributed to the intermixture of tales that bent towards the mythical or the historical, they weren’t meshed together very well and that is probably because of the posthumous nature of the book as Tolkien’s son Christopher put the book together and added sections using his father’s notes to bridges things within a large framework but there was a randomness to things.

Overall The Silmarillion should be seen a collection of mythical and historical tales within a large framework, but one that doesn’t mesh well and at times is disjointed. This is a book for hardcore Tolkien fans not general readers who would be stratified with The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.
21 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Jvega688
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
in perfect condition. The pages and illustrations are fantastic
Reviewed in the United States on December 15, 2017
My book came in un-damaged, in perfect condition. The pages and illustrations are fantastic.
48 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
JGar
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Biblical Epic
Reviewed in the United States on November 14, 2017
With his legendarium, Tolkien set out to create a mythology for the British people. I''d say he succeeded. The Silmarillion follows the world from a creation myth through the destruction of the infamous One Ring. This is not so much a dialogue-driven fantasy novel as it is a... See more
With his legendarium, Tolkien set out to create a mythology for the British people. I''d say he succeeded. The Silmarillion follows the world from a creation myth through the destruction of the infamous One Ring. This is not so much a dialogue-driven fantasy novel as it is a biblical epic, wherein dozens of different stories color the historiography of Middle-earth. I considered The Silmarillion dense and boring as a youngster, but now I''m wondering if maybe this, not Lord of the Rings or The Hobbit, is truly Tolkien''s masterpiece.
25 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
JWolf
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
About The Silmarillion
Reviewed in the United States on December 18, 2013
I have chosen to use this review to tell a little about the Silmarillion because I would venture to think that most persons interested in this work have a fair idea of Tolkien''s writing already and need few opinions from me. I will add, however, that reading this book does... See more
I have chosen to use this review to tell a little about the Silmarillion because I would venture to think that most persons interested in this work have a fair idea of Tolkien''s writing already and need few opinions from me. I will add, however, that reading this book does give a sense that Tolkien put extreme passion into this particular collection as there are many places that lesser authors may have chosen to "phone it in." This collection differs from other works of this series mostly in the regard that fewer pages are needed to cover events. In that sense, persons who may have previously experienced difficulty with the pace of Tolkien''s writing may find this work more pleasing.

The Silmarillion, a posthumous publication from Christopher Tolkien in 1977, combines several myths, or five separate parts, written by J. R. R. Tolkien which remained unfinished upon his death. The stories take place in a time preceding The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings of Middle-earth. Though Tolkien began his work on The Silmarillion prior to writing The Lord of the Rings; each of the five sections had been intended as separate stories, but J. R. R. Tolkien wished them to be published as a single unit when it became clear they would not reach finished stories on their own. Because Tolkien had been so passionate about the works comprising The Silmarillion, he had numerous sources of notes and other material from which Christopher pulled (along with a few of his own necessary “gap-fillers”) to complete the book.

Ainulindale: The first story concerns the creation of Ea, the “world that is”, or the universe encompassing Valinor, Beleriand, Numenor, as well as Middle-earth. Eru (The One) creates the Ainur and commanded them to devise great music from a central theme. Among the Ainur is Melkor, the strongest of the demiurges, who rebelled by creating a song of his own and breaking the Ainurs’ harmony on three occasions. Eru granted the Ainur a vision of Arda and later offered that they may descend to Arda and rule.

The Ainur who ventured to Arda were bound to this world in physical form. The Valar were born of the greatest of the Ainur while the Maiar were of the weakest. The Valar did great work in preparation for the arrival of Elves and Men to Arda, but Melkor ravaged their work in order to keep Arda for himself. The fight between the Valar and Melkor consumes the majority of the Ainuliundale, but ends in the creation of the world.

Valaquenta: Part two tells the story of the mystical powers present in Ea, the Valar and Maiar. Detail is most focused to the Valar and Melkor as well as the story of Melkor’s rise to power over the Maiar who go on to identify as the Balrogs and Sauron.

Quenta Silmarillion: This is the longest tale of the book and describes Silmaril wars, the events leading to the First Age. In Melkor’s continuing destruction of the Valars’ work, the lamps tasked to light the world were obliterated. Leaving Middle-earth and Melkor in darkness, the Valar migrated west to Aman which would become their new home, Valinor.

As the Elves began to awaken, it was the Valor who defended them from Melkor. Many Elves then traveled to Aman as others stayed behind, namely the Sindar under the rule of Thingol and Melian.

Akallabeth: The fourth story occurs in the Second Age and tells of the Downfall of Numenor. The island kingdom of Numenor is granted to three loyal houses of Men.

Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age: The final section is familiar as it leads to the matters that become the subject of The Lord of the Rings.
120 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

EMR
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Magnificent masterpiece
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 22, 2018
I bought The Silmarillion a long time ago in paperback, settled down and started to read. I gave up after a few pages feeling bored and confused. What was this? It was like reading the Bible. I just couldn''t get into it. However, a few months later I tried again. Still...See more
I bought The Silmarillion a long time ago in paperback, settled down and started to read. I gave up after a few pages feeling bored and confused. What was this? It was like reading the Bible. I just couldn''t get into it. However, a few months later I tried again. Still didn''t like it. And then later I tried again. Once more I couldn''t get past the first couple of chapters. Bored, bored, bored. In the end I gave my paperback to charity. Many years later I decided I would try The Silmarillion again. This time I bought it in hardback, thinking that I could guilt myself into reading it as I''d paid so much for it. I knew I was having difficulty reading the first chapters so I forced myself to read two pages a day (not an ideal way to enjoy a book!). Then something magical happened. I found myself enjoying it. By the time I had reached chapter 6 "Of Feanor and the unchaining of Melkor" I was completely gripped and couldn''t put the book down. I didn''t want it to end. I actually felt quite bereft when I''d finished it. The stories of Feanor and his sons and the Silmarils, the fall of Gondolin, the love story of Beren and Luthien, the tragic story of Turin Turambar all completely enthralled me. It is difficult to put into words how completely captivating and engrossing these stories are. How one man had all this inside his head is beyond me. I have one tiny gripe. Why on earth isn''t Thangorodrim and Angband on the map included in the book? It''s like leaving Mordor off the map of Middle Earth in LOTR. It''s essential. In the end I bought Karen Wynn Fonstad''s map book The Atlas of Tolkien’s Middle-earth so I could sort it out in my head. So the moral of the story is if at first you don''t succeed, try, try again. If you persist with this book you will be very well rewarded. It''s the sort of book that will stay with you for a lifetime.
120 people found this helpful
Report
Life Reviewed
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This review will answer most of your questions.
Reviewed in India on December 2, 2018
Wanted to read this book for the past 12 years. Now finally I got this beautiful piece of work. About the quality of the book: This is one of the best quality books out there. Printed on glossy paper. Beautiful illustrations by Ted Nasmuth. Comfortable fonts. Good binding....See more
Wanted to read this book for the past 12 years. Now finally I got this beautiful piece of work. About the quality of the book: This is one of the best quality books out there. Printed on glossy paper. Beautiful illustrations by Ted Nasmuth. Comfortable fonts. Good binding. Its a bit heavy though, so you cannot carry it around. You will need to put it down to read this. This edition is printed in England and imported. About the story: The Silmarillion is a collection of mythopoeic works by English writer J. R. R. Tolkien, it is the story of the creation of the world and of the First Age, this is the ancient drama to which the characters in The Lord of the Rings look back and in whose events some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part. This is the history of the rebellion of Fëanor and his kindred against the gods, their exile from Valinor and return to Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all their heroism, against the great Enemy. If you are a fan of Tolkien and liked the Lord of the brings and Hobbit definitely get this. You will understand so much more of the stories and third history in middle Earth. Uploading some pics for you benefit. Let me know if this review was helpful to you by clicking the button so that I do more such reviews. Thanks for reading.
113 people found this helpful
Report
Djilly L.Top Contributor: Harry Potter
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The one uncompleted book in my vast book collection
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 1, 2019
With fondness i recall how much I enjoyed reading the Hobbit and even more so the Lord of the Rings during my teenage years - I even feigned illness to have a good few days to complete these books. Although I barely read fiction these days, I thought it a great idea to...See more
With fondness i recall how much I enjoyed reading the Hobbit and even more so the Lord of the Rings during my teenage years - I even feigned illness to have a good few days to complete these books. Although I barely read fiction these days, I thought it a great idea to bring the Silmarillion along on a holiday trip. That was a mistake. I was aware the book was never published during the author’s life and that it was completed and composed by his son. However it’s of much higher mythological content than for instance the start of the Lord of the Rings. To me the book just goes on and on about the Elderdays to which there are references in the Lord of the Rings. But the writing style is very different. And it reads more like a dry history text that heaps up exotic dwarf and elven names. To me it was all a bit incoherent or maybe I didn’t try hard enough to find the coherence. Yet I did make a serious effort! Perhaps my setting wasn’t great as I like my holiday reading to be accompanied by a few beers or a good wine, but that doesn’t blend well with the nature of this book as it requires close attention. I never, ever do not finish a book. But the Silmarillion broke this rule, as I gave up after 1/3 and decide to leave it to the Middle Earth fanatics and started to enjoy my holiday.
27 people found this helpful
Report
Demonsub
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of The Best Books I Have Read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 13, 2017
This book is amazing. It covered the entire history of Tolkien’s creation. It is not an easy read as it reads more like a history book rather than a novel and takes a little work to understand names and places, but some very useful family trees and maps are included to aid...See more
This book is amazing. It covered the entire history of Tolkien’s creation. It is not an easy read as it reads more like a history book rather than a novel and takes a little work to understand names and places, but some very useful family trees and maps are included to aid the reader. It’s by far my favourite book of the year so far and I certainly look forward to rereading it in years to come.
26 people found this helpful
Report
Adam
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A beautiful and engrossing masterpiece
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 10, 2017
Deep, captivating, tragic, epic, violent... these are just a few words that describe the stories of the silmarillion. To those familiar with the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings, be warned that the silmarillion is more grim and shocking than what you might have come to...See more
Deep, captivating, tragic, epic, violent... these are just a few words that describe the stories of the silmarillion. To those familiar with the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings, be warned that the silmarillion is more grim and shocking than what you might have come to expect from Tolkien, but this does not at all hinder its greatness. Would absolutely recommend to any Tolkien fan or fan of fantasy/literature in general.
34 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • grendel book

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online

The sale popular Silmarillion online